Effect of Muscle Temperature on Human Muscle Function

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This research was initiated by Professor Anthony Sargeant and Professor David Jones and carried out in Amsterdam.

Temperature effect on the rates of isometric force development and relaxation in the fresh and fatigued human adductor pollicis muscle

de Ruiter CJ, David A Jones, Anthony J Sargeant, Arnold de Haan.

Experimental Physiology

Exp Physiol. 1999 Nov;84(6):1137-50

Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of temperature on the rates of isometric force development and relaxation in electrically activated fresh and fatigued human adductor pollicis muscle. Following immersion of the lower arm for 20 min in water baths of four different temperatures, muscle temperatures were approximately 37, 31, 25 and 22 C. Maximal isometric force was reduced by 16.8 +/- 1.5 % at 22 C. The stimulation frequency-force and -rate of force development relationships were shifted to the left at lower temperatures. Q10 values for the maximal rates of force development and relaxation, and the times for 100 to 50 % and 50 to 25 % force relaxation, were about 2.0 between 37 and 25 C and about 3.8 between 25 and 22 C. However, the time for 50 to 25 % force relaxation had a relatively high Q10 value between 25 and 22 C (6.9) and this parameter also appeared to be more sensitive to fatigue compared to the other indices of relaxation. Nevertheless, the effect of fatigue on all parameters decreased with cooling over the entire (37-22 C) temperature range
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Spinal cord injury in humans – Functional Electrical Stimulation

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This research formed part of the PhD thesis of HL (Karin) Gerrits which was directed by Professor Anthony J Sargeant together with Maria Hopman, David Jones and others.

The results may be useful to optimize stimulation characteristics for functional electrical stimulation and to monitor training effects induced by electrical stimulation during rehabilitation of paralyzed muscles.

Contractile properties of the quadriceps muscle in individuals with spinal cord injury

Gerrits HL, Arnold de Haan, Maria T Hopman, Luc H van Der Woude, David A Jones, Anthony J Sargeant

Muscle Nerve. 1999 Sep;22(9):1249-56

Abstract
Selected contractile properties and fatigability of the quadriceps muscle were studied in seven spinal cord-injured (SCI) and 13 able-bodied control (control) individuals. The SCI muscles demonstrated faster rates of contraction and relaxation than did control muscles and extremely large force oscillation amplitudes in the 10-Hz signal (65 +/- 22% in SCI versus 23 +/- 8% in controls). In addition, force loss and slowing of relaxation following repeated fatiguing contractions were greater in SCI compared with controls. The faster contractile properties and greater fatigability of the SCI muscles are in agreement with a characteristic predominance of fast glycolytic muscle fibers. Unexpectedly, the SCI muscles exhibited a force-frequency relationship shifted to the left, most likely as the result of relatively large twitch amplitudes. The results indicate that the contractile properties of large human locomotory muscles can be characterized using the approach described and that the transformation to faster properties consequent upon changes in contractile protein expression following SCI can be assessed. These measurements may be useful to optimize stimulation characteristics for functional electrical stimulation and to monitor training effects induced by electrical stimulation during rehabilitation of paralyzed muscles.

Strength of leg muscles in human – effects of coactivation of antagonistic muscles

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This research was part of work completed by the brilliant PhD student, Costis Maganaris (now a full Professor in Liverpool), who was supervised by Professor Vasilios Baltzopoulos and Anthony Sargeant.

Differences in human antagonistic ankle dorsiflexor coactivation between legs; can they explain the moment deficit in the weaker plantarflexor leg

CONSTANTINOS N. MAGANARIS, VASILIOS BALTZOPOULOS, ANTHONY J. SARGEANT

Experimental Physiology
Exp Physiol. 1998 Nov;83(6):843-55
The present study examined the hypothesis that the antagonistic ankle dorsiflexor coactivation level during maximum isometric voluntary plantarflexion (MVC) is a function of ankle angle.
Six male subjects generated plantarflexion and dorsiflexion MVC trials at ankle angles of -15 deg (dorsiflexed direction), 0 deg (neutral position), +15 deg (plantarflexed direction) and +30 deg having the knee flexed at an angle of 90 deg. In all contractions surface EMG measurements were taken from tibialis anterior and soleus which were considered representative muscles of all dorsiflexors and plantarflexors, respectively. Antagonistic dorsiflexor coactivation was expressed as normalized EMG and moment. Calculations of the antagonistic dorsiflexor moment were based on the tibialis anterior EMG-dorsiflexor moment relationship from contractions at 50, 40, 30, 20 and 10 % of the dorsiflexion MVC moment.
In both legs dorsiflexor coactivation level followed an open U-shaped pattern as a function of ankle angle. Differences of 9 and 14 % (P < 0.05) were found in the measured net plantarflexion MVC moment between legs at ankle angles of -15 and +30 deg, respectively. No difference (P > 0.05) was found in the calf circumference between legs. Differences were found in the antagonistic dorsiflexor coactivation between legs at ankle angles of -15 and +30 deg. In the weaker leg the antagonistic EMG measurements were higher by 100 and 45 % (P < 0.01) and the estimated antagonistic moments were higher by 70 and 43 % (P < 0.01) compared with the weaker leg at -15 and +30 deg, respectively. This finding was associated with a decreased range of motion (ROM) in the weaker leg (14 %, P < 0.01), such that no difference (P > 0.05) was found in dorsiflexor antagonistic coactivation between legs at end-range ankle angles.
The findings of the study
(i) have to be taken into consideration when estimating musculoskeletal loads in the lower extremity,
(ii) imply that stretching training can result in a stronger plantarflexion at end-range ankle angles through inhibition of the dorsiflexors, and
(iii) imply a neural drive inadequacy during a plantarflexion MVC at end-range angles

Regional variation in recruitment and physiological properties of a single muscle

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This research published in the Journal of Neurophysiology was carried out in Amsterdam by Jo De Ruiter as part of his doctoral thesis supervised by Professor Anthony J Sargeant and Arnold de Haan. It was part of a series of studies examining the regional differences within a single muscle of physiological properties and hence pattern of recruitment in response to different intensities of exercise.

Fast-twitch muscle unit properties in different rat medial gastrocnemius muscle compartments

DeRuiter CJArnold de HaanAnthony J Sargeant.

Journal of Neurophysiology
J Neurophysiol. 1996 Jun;75(6):2243-54
  • 1. The effect of muscle unit (MU) localization on physiological properties was investigated within the fast-twitch fatigue-resistant (FR) and fast-fatigable (FF) MU populations of rat medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle. Single MG MUs were functionally isolated by microdissection of the ventral roots. FR and FF MU properties of the most proximal and distal muscle compartments were compared. The most proximal and distal compartment are subvolumes of the MG innervated by the most proximal and distal primary nerve branch, respectively. A subsample of the isolated units was glycogen depleted and muscle cross sections were stained for glycogen and myosin-adenosinetriphosphatase.
  • 2. It was shown that proximal FF and FR units reached optimum length for force production at shorter muscle lengths compared with the distal FR and FF units.
  • 3. The fast MUs of the proximal compartment had small territories that were located close to and/or within the mixed region (containing type I, IIA, IIX, and IIB fibers) of the muscle. The fast MUs of the distal compartment had greater territories that were located in the more superficial muscle part (containing only type IIX and IIB fibers) and in some cases spanned the entire area of the distal muscle compartment.
  • 4. FR and FF MUs consisted of muscle fibers identified histochemically as type IIX and IIB, respectively.
  • 5. Within each of the FR and FF MU populations, MUs that were located in the most proximal muscle compartment were more resistant to fatigue compared with the units located in the most distal compartment.
  • 6. Cross-sectional fiber areas were smaller for the proximal FR and FF fibers, but specific force did not differ among units. Consequently, when account was taken of the innervation ratio, the proximal FR and FF units produced less force than distal units of the same type. Tetanic forces were 87 +/- 27 (SD) mN (proximal FR), 154 +/- 53 (SD) mN (distal FR), 142 +/- 25 (SD) mN (proximal FF), and 229 +/- 86 (SD) mN (distal FF).
  • 7. The present findings suggest that with increasing demand placed on rat MG during in vivo locomotion, recruitment is likely to proceed from proximal to distal muscle parts within the FR and FF MU populations.

Within a single muscle there can be large differences in fatiguability and other physiological properties

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This research carried out in Amsterdam under the direction of Professor Anthony J Sargeant demonstrated how within the same anatomical muscle there can be quiet different physiological properties in different areas of the same muscle. This work was part of the PhD research of Jo de Ruiter supervised by Professor Tony Sargeant and Arnold de Haan.

Repeated force production and metabolites in two medial gastrocnemius muscle compartments of the rats

De Ruiter CJArnold de HaanAnthony J Sargeant.

Journal of Applied Physiology
J Appl Physiol. 1995 Dec;79(6):1855-61
  • The most proximal and distal motor nerve branches in the rat medial gastrocnemius innervate discrete muscle compartments dominated by fast-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers, respectively. The functional consequences of the difference in oxidative capacity between these compartments were investigated. Wistar rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (90 mg/kg ip). Changes in force of both compartments during 21 isometric contractions (train duration 200 ms, stimulation frequency 120 Hz, 3 s between contractions) were studied in situ with and without blood flow. Without blood flow, force and phosphocreatine declined to a greater extent in the proximal than the distal compartment compared with the run with intact flow. After the protocol without blood flow, when flow was restored, the time constants for force recovery (which were closely associated to the recovery of phosphocreatine) were 37 +/- 7 (SD) (proximal compartment) and 148 +/- 20 s (distal compartment). It was concluded that the proximal compartment had a four times higher oxidative capacity and, therefore, a superior ability for repeated force production.

Oxygen cost of human exercise

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In this research published in Journal of Physiology Anthony Sargeant and his team describe how the recruitment of different types of muscle fibres with increasing exercise intensity changes the oxygen cost of exercise. Thus the relationship of oxygen uptake and mechanical power output is not constant. This is in contrast to the standard teaching of many physiology textbooks.

Non-linear relationship between O2 uptake and power output at high intensities of exercise in humans

Jerzy A. ZoladzArno C. H. J. RademakerAnthony J Sargeant

Journal of Physiology
J Physiol. 1995 Oct 1;488 ( Pt 1):211-7
1. A slow component to pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) is reported during prolonged high power exercise performed at constant power output at, or above, approximately 60% of the maximal oxygen uptake. The magnitude of the slow component is reported to be associated with the intensity of exercise and to be largely accounted for by an increased VO2 across the exercising legs.
2. On the assumption that the control mechanism responsible for the increased VO2 is intensity dependent we hypothesized that it should also be apparent in multi-stage incremental exercise tests with the result that the VO2-power output relationship would be curvilinear.
3. We further hypothesized that the change in the VO2-power output relationship could be related to the hierarchical recruitment of different muscle fibre types with a lower mechanical efficiency.
4. Six subjects each performed five incremental exercise tests, at pedalling rates of 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 rev min-1, over which range we expected to vary the proportional contribution of different fibre types to the power output. Pulmonary VO2 was determined continuously and arterialized capillary blood was sampled and analysed for blood lactate concentration ([lactate]b).
5. Below the level at which a sustained increase in [lactate]b was observed pulmonary VO2 showed a linear relationship with power output; at high power outputs, however, there was an additional increase in VO2 above that expected from the extrapolation of that linear relationship, leading to a positive curvilinear VO2-power output relationship. 6. No systematic effect on the magnitude or onset of the ‘extra’ VO2 was found in relation to pedalling rate, which suggests that it is not related to the pattern of motor unit recruitment in any simple way.

Human Muscle Power

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The ability of generating muscle power power is important whether you are an Olympic athlete, a ballet dancer, or an elderly person wanting to climb the stairs to go to bed. In this comprehensive review of his research Anthony Sargeant points out the importance of different types of muscle fibres that make up the human skeletal muscles that produce power in legs and arms. Tony also points out that in research seeking to measure human muscle power it is essential to measure or control the speed at which the power is generated (this is because power is the product of work and velocity).

Structural and functional determinants of human muscle power
by Anthony J Sargeant

Experimental Physiology
Exp Physiol. 2007 Mar;92(2):323-31

Measurements of human power need to be interpreted in relation to the movement frequency, since that will determine the velocity of contraction of the active muscle and hence the power available according to the power-velocity relationship. Techniques are described which enable movement frequency to be kept constant during human exercise under different conditions. Combined with microdissection and analysis of muscle fibre fragments from needle biopsies obtained pre- and postexercise we have been able ‘to take the muscle apart’, having measured the power output, including the effect of fatigue, under conditions of constant movement frequency. We have shown that fatigue may be the consequence of a metabolic challenge to a relatively small population of fast fatigue-sensitive fibres, as indicated by [ATP] depletion to approximately 30% of resting values in those fibres expressing myosin heavy chain isoform IIX after just 10 s of maximal dynamic exercise. Since these same fibres will have a high maximal velocity of contraction, they also make a disproportionate contribution to power output in relation to their number, especially at faster movement rates. The microdissection technique can also be used to measure phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]), which is an exquisitely sensitive indicator of muscle fibre activity; thus, in just seven brief maximal contractions [PCr] is depleted to levels < 50% of rest in all muscle fibre types. The technique has been applied to study exercise at different intensities, and to compare recruitment in lengthening, shortening and isometric contractions, thus yielding new information on patterns of recruitment, energy turnover and efficiency.

Anthony J Sargeant